Survival Directory

The History Of Nuclear Weapons And Programs Disk 2 of 3


Nuclear History Disk 1 | Nuclear History Disk 3

Get all Three disks for only $30 These 57 videos are on three DVD Disks in MPEG format and are mostly meant to be played on your computer. If you buy them for your home DVD player please make sure your home DVD player supports playing the MPEG format.

CLICK ON BUY NOW TO BUY THIS ITEM FOR $30.00


To order by credit card through paypal click the above BUY NOW button.
To order by money order click on the following link for details
MONEY ORDER PAYMENTS

The History Of Nuclear Weapons And Programs Disk 2

Operation Dominic Fireballs

Pacific Testing 1962, Christmas Island Area 1962 43:40 Min Color (Silent) (Long distance aerial views only) - Sixteen of the Operation Dominic spectacular airdrop nuclear bursts that were detonated near Christmas Island in the Pacific Ocean are shown in this video. These weapons-related devices were dropped from B-52ís staged out of Hawaii from April 27 to July 11, 1962. After the Soviet Union resumed atmospheric testing in violation of a treaty with the United States, President Kennedy authorized the U.S. to resume atmospheric testing on March 2, 1962.

The video, comprised of small rolls of film that had never been released, shows the fireballs of 16 nuclear devices being fired off the southern end of Christmas Island, which had been used earlier by the British for nuclear testing. The United States was striving to increase the yield-to-weight ratio of weapons so they could be delivered by existing aircraft.

The tests shown from the 1962 Operation Dominic were as follows:

AZTEC, April 27, 410 kilotons (kt)
QUESTA, May 4, 670 kt
YUKON, May 8, 100 kt
MESILLA, May 9, 100 kt
ENCINO, May 12, 500 kt
SWANEE, May 14, 97 kt
YESO, June 10, 3 megatons (Mt)
HARLEM, June 12, 1.2 Mt
RINCONADA, June 15, 800 kt
DULCE, June 17, 52 kt
PETIT, June 19, 2.2 kt
OTOWI, June 22, 81.5 kt
BIGHORN, June 27, 7.65 Mt
BLUESTONE, June 30, 1.27 Mt
SUNSET, July 10, 1 Mt
PAMLICO, July 11, 3.88 Mt

Operation Dominic

Johnston Island 1962 19:23 Min Black&White The Johnston Island area segment of Operation Dominic I was divided into two parts, the Fishbowl high-altitude tests and open sea airdrop tests. Much of the film was devoted to the failures that occurred in the high-altitude program. In one test, a rocket was destroyed because it was believed to be off-course, but post flight data revealed that it was on the correct trajectory. Another rocket blew up on the launch pad because of a sticking fuel valve. This caused the high explosives in the weapon to detonate, resulting in the destruction and contamination of the launch pad and surrounding area. In another instance, a rocket had flight irregularities stemming from the wrong configuration of a flight plan. The nuclear device detonated directly over Johnston Island, instead of 26 miles away as planned.

To improve obtaining test data, the Thor launch vehicles (rockets) also carried and deployed three scientific test pods. These reentry pods contained diagnostic equipment, and shortly after they were deployed, the nuclear weapon was detonated. The pods splashed into the sea and were retrieved by helicopters.

The successful rocket-launched, weapons-effects, Operation Fishbowl high-altitude tests conducted in the Johnston Island area in 1962 were as follows:

STARFISH PRIME, July 9, 400-kilometer altitude, 1.4 megaton
CHECKMATE, October 20, tens of kilometers altitude, low (less than 20 kilotons)
BLUEGILL 3 PRIME, October 26, tens of kilometers altitude, submegaton (less than 1 Mt, but more than 200 kt)
KINGFISH, November 1, tens of kilometers altitude; submegaton (less than 1 Mt, but more than 200 kt)
TIGHTROPE, November 4, tens of kilometers altitude, low (less than 20 kilotons)

The five open sea airdrop, weapons-related tests in the Johnston Island area were as follows:
ANDROSCOGGIN, October 2, 75 kilotons (kt)
BUMPING, October 6, 11.3 kt
CHAMA, October 18, 1.59 megatons (Mt)
CALAMITY, October 27, 800 kt
HOUSATONIC, October 30, 8.3 Mt

Operation Doorstep & Operation Cue

1953 Operation Doorstep and Operation Cue 1955 26:00 Min Color This video shows Federal Civil Defense Administration film footage of the March 17, 1953, 16-kiloton ANNIE test and the May 5, 1955, 29-kiloton APPLE-2 test. Both tests were conducted at the Nevada Test Site; ANNIE being part of Operation Upshot-Knothole, and APPLE-2 being part of Operation Teapot. The titles, Operation Doorstep and Cue, were Civil Defense Program names.

In the Operation Doorstep portion, footage shows blast and thermal effects on mannequins, automobiles, and wooden frame houses. Testing of simple basement shelters and complex underground, reinforced-concrete shelters is shown. Soldiers involved in the Desert Rock V exercise are seen in their foxholes with Civil Defense leaders. Observers on "News Nob" are shown illuminated by the explosion. Stop-motion views are shown of a house blown apart by the blast wave.

The Operation Cue portion is narrated by reporter Joan Collin, who shares the sights she witnesses first-hand while observing the APPLE-2 test. From the planning phase through an actual visit to the site after the detonation, she shows viewers the potential results of the explosion and effective ways of sheltering people from the effects of a nuclear blast.

Electrical power experiments included setting up poles, lines, transformers, and a complete substation and observing the thermal and blast effects. Effects are studied on two radio towers and transmitters, a liquefied petroleum and natural gas facility with propane storage tanks, five types of completely furnished houses, rows of mannequins with standard clothing, and canned and packaged food. Spectacular footage shows the awesome destructive power of a nuclear explosion.

Operation Fishbowl

High-Altitude Weapons Effect 1962 28:10 Min Black&White Operation Fishbowl, the Department of Defenseís high altitude testing portion of Operation Dominic I, was conducted in the Johnston Island area of the Pacific testing area in 1962. These five weapons-effects tests, launched by Strypi, Thor, and Nike Hercules rockets, were as follows:

STARFISH PRIME, July 9, 400-kilometer altitude, 1.4 megaton
CHECKMATE, October 20, tens of kilometers altitude, low (less than 20 kt)
BLUEGILL 3 PRIME, October 26, tens of kilometers altitude, submegaton (less than 1 Mt, but more than 200 kt)
KINGFISH, November 1, tens of kilometers altitude; submegaton (less than 1 Mt, but more than 200 kt)
TIGHTROPE, November 4, tens of kilometers altitude, low (less than 20 kt)


Two goals of these tests were to determine if radiation and blast and heat effects of high- altitude detonations were capable of neutralizing an enemy reentry vehicle and capable of determining the blackout effects on radar and communications of various yields and altitudes of bursts.

Operation Greenhouse

1951 22:00 Min Pacific, Color Operation Greenhouse was conducted in April and May of 1951. This test series consisted of four weapons related test shots from the 300-foot level on towers on the Enewetak Atoll Pacific Ocean, two of which greatly aided the pursuit of a hydrogen, or thermonuclear, device.

Carried out by the Atomic Energy Commission, the shots were:
Dog, April 7, 81 kilotons
Easy, April 20, 47 kilotons
George, May 8, 225 kilotons
Item, May 24, 45.5 kilotons


The George experiment proved an H-bomb was possible and led to a crash development program. Item was the first test of the boosting principle, which involved increasing the yield of a weapon.

Operation Hardtack 1

Military Effects Studies Part 1 Basic Effects, Structures and Material Operation Hardtack I 1958 26:00 Min Black&White

Operation Hardtack 2

Military Effects Studies, Part 2 High Altitude Studies Operation Hardtack I 1958 24:45 Min Black&White

Operation Hardtack 3

Military Effects Studies, Part 3 Underwater Tests Operation Hardtack I 1958 18:40 Min Black&White - Operation Hardtack I consisted of 35 nuclear tests conducted at the Pacific Proving Ground between April 28 and August 18, 1958. These tests included balloon, surface, barge, underwater, and rocket-borne high-altitude tests. The first test, YUCCA, was a nuclear device attached to a helium balloon launched from the USS Boxer near Enewetak Atoll.

Hardtack I consisted of three portions; the first was the development of nuclear weapons. This was a continuation of the type of testing conducted at Enewetak and Bikini during the early and mid-1950s. In these tests, the weapons development laboratories, Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory and the University of California Radiation Laboratory, detonated their experimental devices, while the Department of Defense (DoD) provided support and conducted experiments that did not interfere with Atomic Energy Commission activities.

The second portion, sponsored by DoD, consisted of the underwater tests WAHOO and UMBRELLA. WAHOO was detonated in the open ocean and UMBRELLA in the lagoon at Enewetak. The purpose of these tests was to improve the understanding of the effects of underwater explosions on Navy ships and material. These were continuations of earlier underwater testing that included BAKER in Crossroads at Bikini in 1946 and WIGWAM off the U.S. West Coast in 1955.

The DoD also sponsored the third portion, addressing the military problems of air-borne nuclear weapon defense. Three high-altitude tests featured rocket-borne TEAK and ORANGE at Johnston Island and balloon-hoisted YUCCA between Enewetak and Bikini.

Two major aspects of Hardtack Iís experimental program were the development of the weapons themselves and the measurement of the explosive and radiation effects. Also, since the development of a nuclear armed fleet ballistic missile was on a fast track, a portion of Hardtack I was devoted to testing the warhead for the Polaris missile.

The tests comprising the 1958 Operation Hardtack I were as follows:
YUCCA, April 28, Pacific (between Enewetak and Bikini), balloon, weapons effects, 1.7 kilotons (kt)
CACTUS, May 5, Enewetak, surface, weapons related, 18 kt
FIR, May 11, near Bikini, barge, weapons related, 1.36 megatons (Mt)
BUTTERNUT, May 11, near Enewetak, barge, weapons related, 81 kt
KOA, May 12, Enewetak, surface, weapons related, l.37 Mt
WAHOO, May 16, near Enewetak, underwater, weapons effects, 9 kt
HOLLY, May 20, near Enewetak, barge, weapons related, 5.9 kt
NUTMEG, May 21, near Bikini, barge, weapons related, 25.1 kt
YELLOWWOOD, May 26, near Enewetak, barge, weapons related, 330 kt
MAGNOLIA, May 26, near Enewetak, barge, weapons related, 57 kt
TOBACCO, May 30, near Enewetak, barge, weapons related, 11.6 kt
SYCAMORE, May 31, near Bikini, barge, weapons related, 92 kt
ROSE, June 2, near Enewetak, barge, weapons related, 15 kt
UMBRELLA, June 8, near Enewetak, underwater, weapons effects, 8 kt
MAPLE, June 10, near Bikini, barge, weapons related, 213 kt
ASPEN, June 14, near Bikini, barge, weapons related, 319 kt
WALNUT, June 14, near Enewetak, barge, weapons related, 1.45 Mt
LINDEN, June 18, near Enewetak, barge, weapons related, 11 kt
REDWOOD, June 27, near Bikini, barge, weapons related, 412 kt
ELDER, June 27, near Enewetak, barge, weapons related, 880 kt
OAK, June 28, near Enewetak, barge, weapons related, 8.9 Mt
HICKORY, June 29, near Bikini, barge, weapons related, 14 kt
SEQUOIA, July 1, near Enewetak, barge, weapons related, 5.2 kt
CEDAR, July 2, near Bikini, barge, weapons related, 220 kt
DOGWOOD, July 5, near Enewetak, barge, weapons related, 397 kt
POPLAR, July 12, near Bikini, barge, weapons related, 9.3 Mt
SCAEVOLA, July 14, near Enewetak, barge, safety experiment, zero yield
PISONIA, July 17, near Enewetak, barge, weapons related, 255 kt
JUNIPER, July 22, near Bikini, barge, weapons related, 65 kt
OLIVE, July 22, near Enewetak, barge, weapons related, 202 kt
PINE, July 26, near Enewetak, barge, weapons related, 2 Mt
TEAK, August 1, off Johnston Island area, rocket, weapons effects, 3.8 Mt
QUINCE, August 6, Enewetak, surface, weapons related, zero yield
FIG, August 18, Enewetak, surface, weapons related, 20 tons
ORANGE, August 12, off Johnston Island area, rocket, weapons effects, 3.8 Mt


Operation Ivy Parts 1 and 2

1952 1:02:30 Min Color The island of Elugelab is missing! President Eisenhower heard this short report on the Mike shot in Operation Ivy from Gordon Dean, Chairman of the Atomic Energy Commission. Mike was the first full-fledged hydrogen bomb to be tested. The island where the device was detonated was vaporized. The hole Mike left was big enough to accommodate several pentagon-size buildings and deep enough to hold the Empire State Building. Mike's yield was an incredible 10.4 megatons, signaling the expansion of the nuclear arsenal from fission to fusion, the same process that occurs in the Sun.

The detonation of the Mike device was the climax of an intense debate over what would be the nation's correct response to the startling news in 1949 that the Soviet Union had detonated a nuclear weapon. Many wanted the U.S. to develop the means to produce and field a large number of fission bombs of varying yields which could be used for tactical purposes. Others believed that the country should institute a crash program like the Manhattan Project to develop a Super weapon based on the idea of forcing together or fusing light atoms with a fissile device to produce enormous amounts of energy.

After a bitter fight among scientific, government and military officials, the President opted for a crash program to demonstrate the Super bomb, now called a hydrogen or thermonuclear weapon. Many designs were evaluated and rejected until the Mike proposal came along. This concept involved the cooling of hydrogen fuel to a liquid form, near absolute zero, and fusing the hydrogen nuclei into helium using the atomic bomb as a trigger.

The Mike device was a 22-foot-long, 5-foot-diameter cylinder housing canisters of liquid hydrogen fuel. These canisters were surrounded by the atomic trigger. The Mike shot occurred on October 31, 1952, and as scientists watched from 40 miles away as the mushroom cloud rose into the stratosphere, the second generation of nuclear weapons was born.

Mike was followed on November 15, 1952, by the King shot, the largest fission device ever tested. It was an implosion bomb, but with an advanced warhead that enabled it to produce 500 kilotons of power.

Vela Uniform Participation in Operation Nougat & Gnome

1961 to 1962 21:30 Min Black&White The majority of Operation Nougatís nuclear tests were shaft or tunnel tests conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for weapons development purposes. However, this series also included the beginning of the Plowshare Program nuclear tests -- a program to determine how nuclear energy could be used for civilian or peaceful purposes, and for the Vela Uniform Program nuclear tests -- a program for detecting nuclear explosions underground, using ground-based instruments for detecting explosions in outer space, and establishing satellite-based instruments for the detection of explosions in outer space.

Specifically, these scientists and engineers working on the GNOME test evaluated new seismic detectors which they hoped would lead to an underground test detection system. Earlier, different seismic measurement programs were conducted at the NTS by the Atomic Energy Commission and the U.S. Air Force before becoming part of the Vela Uniform Program.

The GNOME test was fired 1200 feet underground in a salt bed formation near Carlsbad, NM, on December 10, 1961. There were 48 subsurface experiments involved, making GNOME the most heavily instrumented seismic test in history. This testing provided valuable data for both the Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs.

Although GNOME was a Plowshare test, the Vela Uniform objective was to determine how the signals and effects of a 3-kiloton device detonated underground in salt beds differed from the outputs of detonations of different yields in other geologic formations. Scientists also wanted to compare the seismic signals from underground tests with that of earthquakes.

The Vela Uniform Program included seven tests conducted at several locations in the continental U.S. and Alaska between October 1963 and July 1971. These tests were SHOAL, SALMON, LONG SHOT, STERLING, SCROLL, DIAMOND DUST, and DIAMOND MINE.

Operation Nougat, conducted from September 15, 1961, to June 30, 1962, consisted of 45 on-continent underground tests, and all but GNOME were conducted at the NTS. The video discusses only some of the Nougat tests; however, the complete listing is provided for additional information.

The tests comprising the 1961-1962 Operation Nougat were as follows:
ANTLER, September 15, 1961, tunnel, weapons related, 2.6 kt
SHREW, September 16, shaft, weapons related, low yield (low yield = less than 20 kilotons)
BOOMER, October 1, shaft, weapons related, low yield
CHENA, October 10, tunnel, weapons related, low yield
MINK, October 29, shaft, weapons related, low yield
FISHER December 3, shaft, weapons related, 13.4 kt
GNOME, December 10, shaft, Plowshare, 3 kt
MAD, December 13, shaft, weapons related, 500 tons
RINGTAIL, December 17, shaft, weapons related, low yield
FEATHER, December 22, tunnel, weapons related, 150 tons
STOAT, January 9, 1962, shaft, weapons related, 5.1 kt
AGOUTI, January 18, shaft, weapons related, 6.4 kt
DORMOUSE, January 30, shaft, weapons related, low yield
STILLWATER, February 8, shaft, weapons related, 3.07 kt
ARMADILLO, February 9, shaft, weapons related, 7.1 kt
HARD HAT, February 15, shaft, weapons effects, 5.7 kt
CHINCHILLA, February 19, shaft, weapons related, 1.9 kt
CODSAW, February 19, shaft, weapons related, low yield
CIMARRON, February 23, shaft, weapons related, 11.9 kt
PLATYPUS, February 24, shaft, weapons related, low yield
PAMPAS, March 1, shaft, joint US-UK, 9.5 kt
DANNY BOY, March 5, crater, weapons effects, 430 tons
ERMINE, March 6, shaft, safety experiment, low yield
BRAZOS, March 8, shaft, weapons related, 8.4 kt
HOGNOSE, March 15, shaft, weapons related, low yield
HOOSIC, March 28, shaft, weapons related, 3.4 kt
CHINCHILLA II, March 31, shaft, weapons related, low yield
DORMOUSE PRIME, April 5, shaft, weapons related, 10.6 kt
PASSAIC, April 6, shaft, weapons related, low yield
HUDSON, April 12, shaft, weapons related, low yield
PLATTE, April 14, tunnel, weapons related, 1.85 kt
DEAD, April 21, shaft, weapons related, low yield
BLACK, April 27, shaft, weapons related, low yield
PACA, May 7, shaft, weapons related, low yield
ARIKAREE, May 10, shaft, weapons related, low yield
AARDVARK, May 12, shaft, weapons related, 40 kt
EEL, May 19, shaft, weapons related, 4.5 kt
WHITE, May 25, shaft, weapons related, low yield
RACCOON, June 1, shaft, weapons related, low yield
PACKRAT, June 6, shaft, weapons related, low yield
DES MOINES, June 13, tunnel, weapons related, 2.9 kt
DAMAN I, June 21, shaft, weapons related, low yield
HAYMAKER, June 27, shaft, weapons related, 67 kt
MARSHMALLOW, June 28, tunnel, weapons effects, low yield
SACRAMENTO, June 30, shaft, weapons related, low yield


Operation Plumbbob

Operation Plumbbob, Military Effects Studies 1957 31:45 Min Black&White Operation Plumbbob, conducted between May 28 and October 7, 1957, represented the biggest, longest, and most controversial test series in the history of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). While most Operation Plumbbob tests contributed to the development of warheads for intercontinental and intermediate range missiles, they also tested air defense and antisubmarine warheads with small yields. Operation Plumbbob had the tallest tower tests to date in the U.S. nuclear testing program, as well as high-altitude balloon tests. One nuclear test involved the largest troop maneuver ever associated with U.S. nuclear testing.

Approximately 18,000 members of the U.S. armed forces participated in exercises Desert Rock VII and VIII during Operation Plumbbob. Their leaders were interested in knowing how the average foot-soldier would stand up, physically and psychologically, to the rigors of the tactical nuclear battlefield.

Studies were conducted of radiation contamination and fallout from a simulated accidental detonation of a weapon; and projects concerning earth motion, blast loading and neutron output were carried out.

Nuclear weapons safety experiments were conducted to study the possibility of a nuclear weapon detonation during an accident. On July 26, 1957, a safety experiment, "PASCAL-A" was detonated in an unstemmed hole at NTS, becoming the first underground shaft nuclear test. The knowledge gained here would provide data to prevent any nuclear yields in accidents that actually did occur. Weapons were designed so they could not give a nuclear yield even in the event of a plane crash.

The first detonation contained underground, RAINIER, was conducted on September 19, 1957, containing all radioactive products underground, thus producing no fallout This test of 1.7 kilotons could be detected around the world by seismologists using ordinary seismic instruments. The RAINIER test became the prototype for larger and more powerful underground tests. The test also subjected toughened weapons to the fireball underground.

The tests comprising the 1957 Operation Plumbbob were as follows:
BOLTZMAN, May 28, tower, weapons related, 12 kilotons (kt)
FRANKLIN, June 2, tower, weapons related, 140 tons
LASSEN, June 5, balloon, weapons related, 0.5 tons
WILSON, June 18, balloon, weapons related, 10 kt
PRISCILLA, June 24, balloon, weapons related, 37 kt
COULOMB-A, July 1, surface, safety experiment, zero yield
HOOD, July 5, balloon, weapons related, 74 kt
DIABLO, July 15, tower, weapons related, 17 kt
JOHN, July 19, rocket, weapons effects, about 2 kt
KEPLER, July 24, tower, weapons related, 10 kt
OWENS, July 25, balloon, weapons related, 9.7 kt
PASCAL-A, July 26, shaft, safety experiment, slight yield
STOKES, August 7, balloon, weapons related, 19 kt
SATURN, August 10, tunnel, safety experiment, zero yield
SHASTA, August 18, tower, weapons related, 17 kt
DOPPLER, August 23, balloon, weapons related, 11 kt
PASCAL-B, August 27, shaft, safety experiment, slight yield
FRANKLIN PRIME, August 30, balloon, weapons related, 4.7 kilotons
SMOKY, August 31, tower, weapons related, 44 kt
GALILEO, September 2, tower, weapons related, 11 kt
WHEELER, September 6, balloon, weapons related, 197 tons
COULOMB-B, September 6, surface, safety experiment, 300 tons
LAPLACE, September 8, balloon, weapons related, 1 kt
FIZEAU, September 14, tower, weapons related, 11 kt
NEWTON, September 16, balloon, weapons related, 12 kt
RAINIER, September 19, tunnel, weapons related, 1.7 kt
WHITNEY, September 23, tower, weapons related, 19 kt
CHARLESTON, September 28, balloon, weapons related, 12 kt
MORGAN, October 7, balloon, weapons related, 8 kt


Operation Redwing

Operation Redwing 1956 25:45 Min Black&White

Military Effects on Operation Redwing

Military Effects on Operation Redwing 1956 31:30 Min Color Operation Redwing, a 17-test nuclear weapons series, was conducted at the Pacific Proving Ground between May 4 and July 21, 1956. The Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) tested high-yield thermonuclear devices that could not be tested at the Nevada Test Site.

Over 10,000 military personnel and civilian employees of the AEC and the Department of Defense participated in these nuclear tests. The LACROSSE and CHEROKEE tests were observed from aboard the USS Mt. McKinley by 15 American press, radio and television reporters. These were the first uncleared U.S. civilians in ten years to observe an American nuclear test in the Pacific.

The AECís progress in miniaturization of warheads had accelerated to where the equivalent of the 90-ton weight of the MIKE device in Operation Ivy could now be dropped from a bomber. Operation Redwing also further advanced the AECís designs of nuclear weapons that would produce reduced fallout and provided new information for the design of nuclear warheads for missiles.

Complete weapons systems were exposed to blast effects in Operation Redwing, and a fallout computer was successfully used for the first time. The series included the CHEROKEE test, the first airdrop by U.S. of a thermonuclear weapon.

Tests comprising the 1956 Operation Redwing were as follows:
LACROSSE, May 4, Enewetak (Runit Island), surface, weapons related, 40 kilotons (kt)
CHEROKEE, May 20, Bikini (near Nam Island), airdrop, weapons related, 3.8 megatons (Mt)
(allowed scientists to make some unique measurements)
ZUNI, May 27, Bikini (Eneman Island), surface, weapons related, 3.5 Mt
YUMA, May 27, Enewetak (Aomon Island), tower, weapons related, 190 tons
ERIE, May 30, Enewetak (Runit Island), tower, weapons related, 14.9 kt
SEMINOLE, June 6, Enewetak (Boken Island), surface, weapons related, 13.7 kt
FLATHEAD, June 11, Bikini (off Iroij Island), barge, weapons related, 365 kt
BLACKFOOT, June 11, Enewetak (Runit Island), tower, weapons related, 8 kt
KICKAPOO, June 13, Enewetak (Aomon Island), tower, weapons related, 1.49 kt
OSAGE, June 16, Enewetak (near Runit Island), airdrop, weapons related, 1.7 kt
INCA, June 21, Enewetak ( Lujor Island), tower, weapons related, 15.2 kt
DAKOTA, June 25, Bikini (off Iroij Island), barge, weapons related, 1.1 Mt
MOHAWK, July 2, Enewetak (Eleleron Island), tower, weapons related, 360 kt
APACHE, July 8, Enewetak (off Dridrilbwij Island), barge, weapons related, 1.85 Mt
NAVAJO, July 10, Bikini (off Iroij Island), barge, weapons related, 4.5 Mt
TEWA, July 20, Bikini (off Nam Island), barge, weapons related, 5 Mt
HURON, July 21, Enewetak (off Dridrilbwij Island), barge, weapons related, 250 kt

 

The ultimate survival and survivalist Mega collection.

We feature the worlds largest and the ultimate survival and survivalist collection of over 21,000 survival books and military manuals.